About

This cutting-edge series is designed to assist established researchers, academics, postgraduate/graduate students and their supervisors across higher education faculties and departments to incorporate novel, postqualitative, new materialist, and critical posthumanist approaches in their research projects and their academic writing. In addition to these substantive foci, books within the series are inter-, multi- or transdisciplinary and will be in dialogue with perspectives such as Black feminisms and Indigenous knowledges,decolonial, African, Eastern and young children’s philosophies.

Transformative

This series aims to bring about radical change in research practices by doing justice to the complexity of reality in its efforts to include all humans, nonhumans and the more-than-human

Transdisciplinary

The series helps researchers to work with and across disciplinary perspectives, to make lateral connections and to be responsive and responsible to other fields of study

Accessible

Although the series' primary aim is to be accessible to postgraduate and doctoral students, its scope makes it attractive to established academics already working with postqualitative approaches.

Postqualitative Research

 This website aims to support the book series with supplementary materials such as videos, images and other forms of 3D transmodal expression of ideas. 

Book Resources

The authors have collected resources for each chapter – tried and tested ideas that may work in your setting. Some of them are images that are also in the chapters themselves but perhaps differing in size and colour. Many of the resources are links to websites and YouTube.

Blog

The website blog gives editors and readers of the books the opportunity to share their experiences and ideas.

Karin Murris

CHIEF EDITOR

Dr Karin Murris is Professor of Pedagogy and Philosophy at the School of Education, University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Professor of Early Childhood Education at the
University of Oulu, Finland. She is a teacher educator and grounded in academic philosophy. Her main research interests are: child studies, school ethics, philosophy
with children, Reggio Emilia, posthuman pedagogies and postqualitative research methods.

Weili Zhao

Editor

Dr Weili Zhao is a Professor in the Faculty of Education at Hangzhou Normal University, China. She is interested in unpacking China’s current educational thinking and practices at the nexus, and as the (dis)assemblage, of tradition and modernity, East and West. Specifically, her research explicates the historical-cultural-philosophical insights of Chinese knowledge, curriculum, and educational thinking, say, Yijing, Daoist, and Confucian wisdom, to hopefully dialogue with, for mutual informing and clarifications, the recent post-foundational, new materialist, and post-humanist turns in the Western scholarship.

Simone Fullagar,

Author

Professor Simone Fullagar, FAcSS, leads the Women in Sport research group at Griffith University, Australia. As an interdisciplinary sociologist Simone’s work uses feminist post-structuralist and new materialist approaches to examine gender inequalities in sport and leisure, as well as the gendering of health and emotional wellbeing. Simone has led projects that examine women's and young people's mental health as a sociocultural issue.

Candace R. Kuby

Author

Candace R. Kuby is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Curriculum at the University of Missouri, serving as the Department Chair and the Director of Qualitative Inquiry. She received her PhD in literacy, culture, and language education from Indiana University. Dr. Kuby previously taught primary grades in public U.S. schools and preschoolers in Japan. She currently teaches courses on early childhood literacy, approaches to qualitative inquiry, and philosophical perspectives in educational research.

Carol A. Taylor

Author

Carol A. Taylor is Professor of Higher Education and Gender, and Director of Research(Department of Education), at the University of Bath, UK. Carol is interested in the entangled relations of knowledge-power-gender-space-ethics, and her research utilizes feminist, new materialist, and posthumanist theories and methodologies to explore gendered inequalities, spatial practices, and staff and students’ participation in a range of higher educational sites.

Vivienne Bozalek

Author

Professor Vivienne Bozalek is the Director of Teaching and Learning at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. Prior to this she was Chairperson of the Department of Social Work, University of Western Cape. She holds a PhD from Utrecht University. Her areas of research, publications and expertise include the use of social justice and the political ethics of care perspectives, innovative pedagogical approaches in higher education, feminist and participatory research methodologies, posthumanism, feminist new materialist and critical family studies.

Karen Malone

Author

Dr. Karen Malone is Research Director and Professor of Environmental Sustainability and Childhood Studies in the School of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne. Professor Malone’s research is in environmental sustainability, urban ecologies, ecophilosophy, climate change, and childhood studies with a focus on human/nonhuman encounters of urban landscapes She theorises using posthumanist and agential realist/new materialist approaches with human, kin and materials using postqualitative methodologies in a variety of geographically diverse places.

Asilia Franklin-Phipps

Author

Asilia Franklin-Phipps is an Assistant Professor at SUNY New Paltz in the Department of Teaching and Learning. Asilia received her Ph.D. in Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education from the University of Oregon where she taught in both Educational Studies and Ethnic Studies. Asilia received an M.A. in Teaching of English and an Ed.M. in English Education from Teachers College, Columbia. Asilia writes about affect, embodiment, pedagogy, and race knowledge. She is currently thinking about the pedagogical and research potential of arts practices and popular culture in teaching and learning about race and racism.

Lauren Hermann

Artist

Lauren Hermann is an artist, instructor, and doctoral candidate in Art Education at the
University of Missouri. Lauren has spent her career in K-12 public education teaching art and serving in various leadership roles. Her art, like her research, is focused on relations and intersections; investigating how our practices in education can become
more just through exploring the ethics of our relationships. She resides in Columbia, Missouri with her husband and three boys.

Get it from Routledge

Blog

Contact Us

If you are interested in submitting a proposal for the series, please write to the Chief Editor, Professor Karin Murris at karin.murris(at)oulu.fi

Contact Us